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voyage against time
Argonaut's Wheel
Argonaut's Wheel
Argonaut's Wheel
Argonaut's Wheel
Argonaut's Wheel
Estimated Price

$2,000 - $5,000 USD

voyage against time

Argonaut's Wheel is a running-fight style strategy board game that tests memory, attentiveness, and perception.

A game of simple rules and positioning using "time" as the ultimate leveler, players must chart out their course in order to capture their opponent's cone first!

The game board's playing surface–resembling the layers and rings of a tree trunk accentuates the game's eight stations, as players race to move cones and discs into attack position.

Each player is only in control of the three stations in front of them. So, players must do their best to anticipate the wheel's movement - one revolution at a time - and where pieces will eventually end up, in order not to befall the ultimate fate of the wheel.

1. Object

Argonaut’s Wheel is a two-player game, and each player controls three black pieces or three white pieces: two discs and one cone.

The game board is a wheel that is divided into eight stations, and over the course of a game, the wheel may be rotated, moving the stations in front of the players. Regardless of the rotation of the game board, a single station must always be positioned directly in front of each player.

The wheel also includes a time stone, which is a small stone that is used to track the revolutions of the wheel. The time stone is placed on the perimeter of the wheel’s inner square, and that appears in each station, half-way toward the center of the wheel.

During the course of the game, each player is always in control of the three stations in front of them: center station, left station, and right station. The two remaining stations between each player are neutral; neither player controls these stations.

The first player to move their cone into the same station as the opposing cone is the winner.

1.1. Setup

Each player sits across from each other on opposite sides of the wheel, and players should decide on playing the black pieces or the white pieces. Set up the game board as follows.

The black player should also place the time stone in the space provided in the neutral station to their left.

2. Movement

Players alternate turns, with the player in control of the black pieces opening play; for subsequent games, the loser of a previous round should decide who goes first. During each turn, a player may choose to either move any piece the player controls in one of their left, center, or right stations; alternatively, the player may choose to rotate the wheel instead of moving a piece.

Players can only move their pieces when they are located in their own left, center, or right stations. If a player’s piece is positioned in a neutral station or in any of the opposing player’s stations, then that player will be unable to move that piece.

After a player moves a piece, the time stone should be placed in the neutral station to the black player’s left, unless it is already there. If a player chooses to rotate the wheel instead of move a piece, simply leave the time stone where it is.

2.1. Left Station

From the left station, a player may move their own piece exactly two stations to the left or to the right.

2.2 Center Station

From the center station, a player may move their own piece directly across the wheel to the opposing player’s center station.

2.3 Right Station

From the right station, a player may move their own piece only one station to the left or to the right.

2.4 Rotate the Wheel

Players can also elect to rotate the wheel on their turn, instead of moving a piece. To rotate the wheel, turn the wheel one station counterclockwise.

3. Pieces and Gameplay

Each player controls two discs and one cone, and discs are two-sided pieces that can be either living or dead. A living disc is represented by the smooth side of the disc, while a dead disc is represented by the side of the disc with a small hole. Living discs should be placed smooth-side up, while dead disks should be placed hole-side up. Living discs may be moved on a player’s turn, while dead discs cannot be moved.

3.1 Cones

  1. Cones can kill opposing cones.
    When a cone is moved into the same station as an opponent’s cone, that player kills the opposing cone and wins the game.
  2. Cones can kill opposing discs.
    When a cone is moved into the same station as an opponent’s living disc, the cone will kill the disc. The disc should be turned hole-side up to indicate that it is now dead, and the attacking player’s cone should be placed upside down to fit into the hole on the disc.
  3. Cones cannot kill opposing cones unless a cone has already been moved.
    Before a player uses their cone to kill the opposing player’s cone, at least one player’s cone must have been moved from its station on a previous turn. Once either player moves their cone for the first time each game, the battle sequence is initiated, and cones can then kill opposing cones to win the game.
  4. Cones cannot land on a player’s own living discs.
    A player cannot move their cone into the same station as one of their own living discs.

3.2 Discs

  1. Discs cannot land on cones.
    A disc cannot be moved into the same station as either player’s cone.
  2. Discs cannot land on opposing discs.
    A disc cannot be moved into the same station as an opposing player’s disc.
  3. Discs can land on a player’s own living discs.
    A player may move their disc into the same station as their other living disc, resulting in a stack of two living discs. A living disc cannot, however, land on a dead disc.
  4. Dead disks cannot move.
    When a disc is killed, it must remain in its station and cannot be moved.

3.3 Stacks

  1. Stacks can be moved in tandem, or the top disc can be moved independently.
    A player may move a stack of two discs together as one, or that player may choose to move just the top living disc.
  2. Stacks can be killed by cones.
    If an opposing player’s cone is moved into the same station as the other player’s stack of two discs, then both discs in the stack will be killed. That player should place both discs on the stack hole-side up to indicate that both discs are now dead, with the attacking cone placed upside down to fit into the hole on the top disc.

3.4 Resurrection

Although cones can be used to kill discs, dead discs and dead stacks can be resurrected. When a disc or stack is resurrected, it should be turned smooth-side up to indicate that it is now alive and can be moved again on subsequent turns. The cone should be placed on top of the resurrected disc or stack, creating a spire.

There are two types of spires. A free spire is a spire comprised of discs and cones of the same color; a prisoner spire is a spire comprised of discs and cones of different colors.

  1. Cones can resurrect dead discs and stacks.
    When either player’s cone moves into the same station as any dead disc, that dead disc is resurrected. Similarly, when either player’s cone moves into the same station as a dead stack, that stack is resurrected.
  2. Spires can be killed by the opposing cone.
    When a player moves their cone into the same station as a spire, that player kills the opposing spire and wins the game.
  3. Free spires can be moved in tandem, or the cone can be moved independently.
    Similar to a stack, a player may move their own free spire as one piece, or that player may choose to move just the cone.
  4. Free spires can only be moved into unoccupied stations.
    Free spires cannot be moved into the same station as any other disc, cone, stack, or spire. Therefore, free spires cannot create a stack, resurrect a dead disc, nor kill an opposing cone.
  5. Prisoner spires cannot be moved until the cone on the spire is moved.
    If one player’s disc or stack is resurrected by the opposing player’s cone, the resulting prisoner spire cannot be moved until that opposing player’s cone is moved on a subsequent turn. Once the cone has been moved, the remaining living disc or stack can be moved normally.

4. Revolutions

Most turns, players can choose to either move a piece or rotate the wheel. However, whenever a player has no legal moves, the player must rotate the wheel.

Because the time stone is used to track the rotation of the wheel, a full revolution occurs when the time stone remains in the same station for one full revolution of the wheel. In this case, the time stone will have traveled from its original position (the neutral station to the black player’s left) completely around the wheel, returning back to that neutral station.

4.1 Single Revolution

After any single full revolution of the wheel, the first player following this revolution must attempt to move a piece on the player’s next turn before being allowed to rotate the wheel. If this player is able to make a legal move, then the time stone should be reset as normal after the piece is moved, and the game proceeds as normal—the other player may then choose to either move a piece or rotate the wheel, without restrictions.

However, if the first player following a single full revolution is unable to make a legal move, then the player would rotate the wheel. The second player must then attempt to move a piece, if possible, before the player allowed to rotate the wheel.

Regardless of whether the second player moves a piece or rotates the wheel, play would then proceed normally, with players allowed to either move a piece or rotate the wheel, without restrictions.

4.2 Double Revolution

After two full sequential revolutions of the wheel with no piece movement, all dead discs and stacks are immediately resurrected. The active player should immediately turn all discs and stacks smooth-side up and proceed with their turn, following the same restrictions that apply from 4.1. (i.e., on only their next subsequent turns, both players must attempt to make a legal move before rotating the wheel).

4.3 Triple Revolution

After three full sequential revolutions of the wheel with no piece movement, the game ends in a draw.

Argonaut's Wheel
  1. Solid American walnut wood cut and placed as end grain blocks, finished with general finishes arm-r-seal – satin finish sand between coats
  2. All wood connections for board game rotates from the base
  3. Solid marble slab - Specification: Danube marble cut, buffed, and polished
  4. Corian - silver birch simulated stone used for the construction of 1 set of game pieces
  5. Corian - deep night sky simulated stone used for the construction of 1 set of game pieces